HEALTHY=WEALTHY-GOT LANOLEIC ACID?

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Tips on reducing poor cardio health pertaining to your cooking oil

Last week, I posted a video on how to determine whether you oils includes Linoleic acid, which research is proven as a health risk. Linoleic acid is a polyunsaturated essential fatty acid that is found mostly in plant oils. It is known as the parent fatty acid of the omega-6 series, and it is essential for human nutrition because it cannot be synthesized by the human body. It plays an important role in many biochemical processes and is used by the body as a source of energy. Linoleic acid can help improve brain, heart, skin, bone reproductive healthHowever, consuming too many omega-6 fatty acids can lead to health issues like inflammation and cardiovascular disease.  Research indicate that Linoleic acid is found in many or our foods including our cooking oils.  Health and Fitness Place online magazine summarized the pros and cons of cooking oil. While today's post is to alert family on this product and how to minimize your consumption of Linoleic in your cooking oils.  Let's first summarize some of the more popular cooking oils:

Olive Oil

Olive oil is a staple in Mediterranean cuisine and is known for its rich flavor and health benefits. It is made from pressed olives and is available in different grades, including extra virgin, virgin, and refined.

Pros: Olive oil is rich in healthy monounsaturated fats, which can help lower cholesterol and reduce the risk of heart disease. It also contains antioxidants, which have anti-inflammatory properties and may help protect against chronic diseases.

Cons: Olive oil has a low smoke point, which means it is not suitable for high-heat cooking methods. It is also more expensive than other types of cooking oil.

 

Vegetable Oil

Vegetable oil is a popular choice for cooking due to its neutral flavor and high smoke point. It is made from a blend of different plant-based oils, including soybean, corn, and canola oil.

Pros: Vegetable oil has a high smoke point, which means it can withstand high heat without breaking down and releasing harmful compounds. It is also low in saturated fat and high in polyunsaturated and monounsaturated fats, which are beneficial for heart health.

Cons: Vegetable oil is highly processed and often contains unhealthy additives, such as trans fats. It is also high in omega-6 fatty acids, which can be harmful in excess and contribute to inflammation in the body.

 
 

Coconut Oil

Coconut oil is a popular choice for health-conscious individuals and is often touted as a superfood due to its numerous health benefits. It is made from pressed coconut meat and is available in both refined and unrefined varieties.

Pros: Coconut oil is rich in medium-chain triglycerides (MCTs), which are quickly metabolized by the body and may promote weight loss and improve brain function. It also has a high smoke point and is suitable for high-heat cooking methods.

Cons: Coconut oil is high in saturated fat, which can contribute to high cholesterol levels and increase the risk of heart disease. It is also more expensive than other types of cooking oil.

 

Avocado Oil

Avocado oil is a relatively new addition to the cooking oil market and is known for its health benefits and mild flavor. It is made from pressed avocadoes and is available in both refined and unrefined varieties.

Pros: Avocado oil is rich in healthy monounsaturated fats, which can help lower cholesterol and reduce the risk of heart disease. It also contains antioxidants and anti-inflammatory compounds, which may help protect against chronic diseases.

Cons: Avocado oil is more expensive than other types of cooking oil and may not be widely available in all grocery stores.

 
 

Canola Oil

Canola oil is a popular choice for cooking due to its neutral flavor and high smoke point. It is made from the seeds of the canola plant and is widely available in most grocery stores.

Pros: Canola oil is low in saturated fat and high in healthy monounsaturated and polyunsaturated fats, which can help lower cholesterol and reduce the risk of heart disease. It also has a high smoke point, which makes it suitable for high-heat cooking methods.

Cons: Canola oil is highly processed and often contains unhealthy additives, such as trans fats. It is also high in omega-6 fatty acids, which can be harmful in excess and contribute to inflammation in the body.

 

Sesame oil

Sesame oil is a plant-based oil made from sesame seeds. It has a distinctive nutty flavor that adds depth to a variety of dishes, including stir-fries, marinades, and dressings.

Pros: Sesame oil is a healthy choice for cooking and has several benefits. It is rich in antioxidants, such as sesamol and sesamin, which have anti-inflammatory and anti-cancer properties. Additionally, sesame oil contains polyunsaturated and monounsaturated fats, which can help reduce the risk of heart disease.

Cons: One of the main drawbacks of sesame oil is its low smoke point, which means it is not suitable for high-heat cooking such as deep frying. Lastly, the strong nutty flavor of sesame oil may not be to everyone’s taste and can overpower other ingredients.

 
 

Peanut oil

Peanut oil is a popular plant-based oil that is commonly used in cooking. It has a high smoke point, making it suitable for high-heat cooking methods such as deep frying. Peanut oil has a mild, nutty flavor that complements a wide range of dishes.

Pros: Peanut oil has a high smoke point, making it ideal for high-heat cooking methods such as deep frying. It has a mild, nutty flavor that complements a wide range of dishes. It is also a good source of vitamin E, an antioxidant that helps protect cells from damage. In addition, peanut oil is affordable and widely available in grocery stores and supermarkets.

Cons: One of the main concerns with peanut oil is its potential to trigger allergic reactions in individuals with peanut allergies. Peanut oil is also high in saturated fats, which can raise cholesterol levels and increase the risk of heart disease if consumed in large amounts.

 Since not all oils are created equal from olive oil to vegetable oil to coconut oil, there are countless options when it comes to choosing one. Each type of oil has its own distinct flavor, smoke point, and nutritiol profile, making some better suited for certain types of dishes than others, however, we all need to eliminate health risks when identified.  Today is the compound Linoleic acid. There are two simple recommendations: (1) if you have not used olive oil, swap out the above for olive oil, since olive oil is not high on the list, (2) to further eliminate Linoleic, be sure to purchase extra light olive oil that is cold pressed and has one ingredient-that is olive oil. If it reads other oils, that is a huge red flag.  If you have not seen my post last week Wednesday with the brief demo, please check it out.

 

Do you have a cooking oil that did not make the list that promotes cardio health? If yes, please add in the comment section.

#health=wealthy #Linoleicacid #cardiovascular #oliveoils #cookingoils #

Warm Regards,

 

CeeCee

 
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